Thank you Joseph Hernandez, Thrillist senior travel editor, for this amazing recommendation!

Here’s what he had to say about Lini Lambrusco Labrusca Rosso, one of his top picks for Lambrusco in the U.S. today:

“Tiny bubbles and a bitter edge, like orange pith, make this a nice aperitif, to drink with stinky cheeses and charcuterie. Soft-textured, it tastes of black cherry, cola, and really ripe blackberries.”

Thank you, Joseph!

Click here for the complete article.

Andrea Scanzi is one of Italy’s leading political essayists, wine writers, television personalities, and gourmets (see the Wikipedia entry on Andrea here).

Here’s what he had to say about Lini’s Lambrusco Metodo Classico nearly 10 years ago. The rest is history…

The family’s Metodo Classic Lambrusco, he wrote, “is made using [Lambrusco] Salamino grapes. I find it to be one of the most elegant and winning wagers by a Reggio Emilia winery ever undertaken. It’s even more fascinating than some of their classic method wines” made from conventional grapes.

We just had to share this glowing review of our 2005 Lambrusco Metodo Classico by a favorite Italian wine writer, Giovanna Romeo. Here’s what she had to say about our wine on Vino e Cibo, one of Italy’s most popular food and wine blogs and online magazines. Thank you, Giovanna!

It’s vintage-dated 2005. Yes, you got that right. It’s 2005.

More than 10 years of aging on the lees plus just the right amount of time since disgorgement for a sensational glass.

A truly great wine, intense and vibrant, endowed with gorgeous acidity that keeps it freshly and totally balanced. No sign of aging here. Just complex aromas and flavors: Citrus notes of blood orange, wild berries, wild strawberries and raspberries, radish and rhubarb. Delicious, extremely delicious, approachable with creamy, fine, and intense bubbles. Rich and succulent in the mouth, this is a Lambrusco that sheds off its humble origins and rises up to true excellence.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you “the” Lambrusco.

Giovanna Romeo
Vino e Cibo
April 2019

“The Bacchanalia,” writes Daniel Kriger this week for PUNCH, “was born out of the challenge to create a cocktail that would transcend rules and traditional flavor profiles to appeal to all types of drinkers.”

One of the cocktail’s ingredients is Lambrusco, “preferably Lini” he specifies.

Click here for the recipe.

Increasingly, mixologists across the U.S. have been using Lambrusco as an ingredient in the new cocktails they are creating.

We couldn’t have been more thrilled to see Lini mentioned in PUNCH, the leading online journal in the U.S. today for cocktails and wine.

Image via PUNCH.

Alicia Lini recently came across this 20018 Rolling Stone review by Filippo Polidori, one of Italy’s leading influencers. In his article, he pairs Lini Lambrusco Scuro with Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run” and he quotes “his friend” Oliviero Toscani, the celebrated Italian photographer.

Their conclusion? There is no wine hipper than Lambrusco.

We’ve translated the piece in its entirety here. Enjoy!

Did you know that Lambrusco used to be as popular in the U.S. as it was in Italy?

By the end of the 1970s, 50 percent of the Italian wine exported to the U.S. was Lambrusco, although that trend changed.

But as often happens, neither man nor the market are always grateful.

Despite the hard work of Lambrusco producers, for years their wines were consumed almost exclusively in the region where they were produced.

25 years later Lambrusco has returned and people are talking about it.

Today [2008], Lambrusco is the biggest selling wine in Brazil.

Its popularity is owed to its simplicity, to its directness.

Once, when I happened to be talking with my friend, the often genius Oliverio Toscani [the famous Italian photographer], he offered this definition:

“A wine that got around because it was an easy hook-up.”

Lambrusco’s strength comes from its easygoing nature. But it’s also what holds it back.

In recent years, concentrated, muscular, steroid-driven wines have been the trend. And simplicity is seen as banality.

But despite these challenges, Lambrusco has returned to the top and people love it again. It’s “vintage” and young people like that.

Oliveri Toscani had this to say: “Lambrusco is the true wine of Italy. It’s like Marcello Mastroianni. Who could be better than him to represent Italy? Lambrusco has an Italian face. But we Italians are embarrassed by it because it’s not trendy. It’s ridiculous. Actually, Lambrusco is trendy, more so than other wines! If Italians were truly chic, they would get it.”

This is Lambrusco! A human wine that allows you to drink well without expecting payback.

When I sat down to write this article, I picked a CD that represented two different musical souls: Rock and folk.

Bruce Springsteen is just the right artist and “Born to Run” is the perfect sound track.

The wine I chose is Lini 910 Lambrusco Scuro.

From the moment you pour it into the glass, the brilliant ruby red color and the aromas of cherry and strawberry let you know you are with someone “simpatico.” This Lambrusco needs no introduction to be appreciated. It’s testament to simplicity’s greatness.

Filippo Polidori
Rolling Stone (Italia)
February 2008