There’s a saying often repeated among American food and wine professionals (the first time our American blogger heard it, it was uttered by legendary restaurateur Danny Meyer): If it grows with it, it goes with it.

We just loved this post by veteran wine blogger and writer Vicki Denig on “The wines to drink with 7 iconic Italian dishes.”

White truffles from Piedmont? Nebbiolo (check!)

Bistecca fiorentina? Chianti (is there any other?)

Trenette with Pesto? Vermentino (so good)

And, of course, ragù alla bolognese? None other than Lambrusco!

When you travel to Emilia, you’ll find that the Emilians drink nothing but Lambrusco. It’s the canonical pairing for their style of cooking and their famous food products (Prosciutto di Parma, Culatello, salumi, Parmigiano Reggiano, etc.).

Italy’s intrinsic regionalism is part of what makes the mosaic of its gastronomy so fascinating and compelling.

We couldn’t have been more thrilled that Vicki recommended our wines in her post.

Thank you, Vicki!

Click here for the post.

Just had to share this photo from a few years ago when the Lini family hosted some American friends at the winery with a classic Emilia-style pre-lunch Saturday aperitivo.

When we think of Lambrusco pairings, it’s only natural to go straight to prosciutto, salumi, and the classic ragù that are served in Emilia.

But one of the best pairings, however surprising to some, is pinzimonio, crudités served with a drizzle of aged balsamic vinegar.

It’s such a classic of Emilian hospitality and it’s wonderful on a warm summer day.

WE MISS ITALY! WE MISS EMILIA!

Above: Alicia Lini shows off a classic method wine as it ages in bottle.

Despite the fact that we are living during a global wine renaissance, when there is more information about wine and winemaking available to consumers and professionals than ever before, there is still a lot of confusion regarding sparkling wine production.

Part of our mission here at the Lini Lambrusco USA blog is to help fans of our wines navigate the often complicated landscape of sparkling wine across the world.

So let’s begin with some basics.

Nearly all sparkling wine is made by fermenting the wine twice, the second time in a pressurized environment. CO2 is a natural byproduct of fermentation. And so when you ferment wine in a pressurized environment, the CO2 is captured and it gives the wines their bubbles.

There are two primary methods employed by sparkling winemakers.

tank method

The tank method is often called the Charmat method by English speakers (the name comes from the Frenchman, Eugène Charmat, who patented a new model of pressurized stainless steel vat for the production of sparkling wine in 1907). In Italy, it is also called the Martinotti method after the Italian professor who perfected it in the 20th century.

A still wine is produced, called the “base” wine. It is then re-fermented in pressurized, temperature-controlled vats.

classic method

The classic method is also known as the traditional method. It’s exactly the same as the Champagne method. But in accordance with European law, “Champagne method” can only be used in Champagne, France where the eponymous wines are produced.

A still wine is produced (the base wine). The wine is then re-fermented in bottles.

There’s a lot more to both methods. But this is a great place to start.

Lini makes both tank method and classic method Lambrusco. And it also produces classic method Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

From the department of “just in case you were wondering”…

We know that the Romans used the word Lambrusco.

In ancient Latin, it appears as lambruscum or labrusca. It denoted “wild grape varieties” and can be found in the works of writers like Pliny and Columella.

But the earliest known mention in the Italian language dates back to the early 14th century when Bolognese jurist and agriculturalist writer Pietro de’ Crescenzi used it to refer to the specific grape variety. At least so it is believed (according to top Italian lexicographers).

Images via the Wikipedia entry for Pietro de’ Crescenzi.

Another Lambrusco rosato that I absolutely love is the Lini Labrusca Rosato,” wrote top wine blogger Katrina René on her popular site Corkscrew Concierge last week.

“I’ve had it on a few occasions and love it on its own as well as with Cajun and Creole cuisine. In fact, I love anything from Lini.”

Check out her wonderful post on Italian rosé here.

Thank you, Kat! You rock!

We were so thrilled to see this Instagram post and tasting note from Alessandra Esteves, Master of Wine candidate and founder of the Florida Wine Academy: “Lambrusco Rosé: dry, tart and delicious, with delicate bubbles. Lini 910 Labrusca was perfect with Sunday pizza.”

Thank you, Alessandra! That means so much coming from you! We can wait to meet and taste with you one of these days. And we’re looking forward to next year’s VinoSummit!

That’s “Shanghai Noodle Surf + Turf” at Meyers & Chang in Boston above: “Soy marinated beef + shrimp, bell peppers + bean sprouts come together in a zingy black pepper sauce in the wok with wheat noodles. Brightened up with a little peanut + lime” (via the restaurant’s Instagram).

Hungry yet?

They only have a handful of wines on their list. But man, it’s such a great wine program!

Here’s their tasting note for the Lini Lambrsuco Labrusca Rosato: “Sparkling rosé – sour cherries, strawberry jam. Dry – friendly with all sorts of food!”

Right now we are DREAMING of pairing the Labrusca with that dish. But alas, they don’t deliver to Emilia!

It’s on our list for when we can get back to America!