Jaynes Gastropub helped us get the party started when we held a Lini Lambrusco garden party in San Diego back in July of this year.

In the meantime, a lot of folks have inquired as to where they can find the wines for purchase.

We were thrilled to learn that they are now available retail and by-the-glass at San Diego’s hippest wine shop, Vino Carta (in Little Italy in downtown San Diego).

San Diego’s fine wine scene has exploded over the last couple of years. We are so proud to be part of it!

Thank you, Vino Carta! We’ll come out and see you early next year.

Vino Carta
2161 India St.
San Diego CA 92101
(619) 564-6589
Google map

Image via the Vino Carta Facebook.

Above: Alicia Lini shows off a classic method wine as it ages in bottle.

Despite the fact that we are living during a global wine renaissance, when there is more information about wine and winemaking available to consumers and professionals than ever before, there is still a lot of confusion regarding sparkling wine production.

Part of our mission here at the Lini Lambrusco USA blog is to help fans of our wines navigate the often complicated landscape of sparkling wine across the world.

So let’s begin with some basics.

Nearly all sparkling wine is made by fermenting the wine twice, the second time in a pressurized environment. CO2 is a natural byproduct of fermentation. And so when you ferment wine in a pressurized environment, the CO2 is captured and it gives the wines their bubbles.

There are two primary methods employed by sparkling winemakers.

tank method

The tank method is often called the Charmat method by English speakers (the name comes from the Frenchman, Eugène Charmat, who patented a new model of pressurized stainless steel vat for the production of sparkling wine in 1907). In Italy, it is also called the Martinotti method after the Italian professor who perfected it in the 20th century.

A still wine is produced, called the “base” wine. It is then re-fermented in pressurized, temperature-controlled vats.

classic method

The classic method is also known as the traditional method. It’s exactly the same as the Champagne method. But in accordance with European law, “Champagne method” can only be used in Champagne, France where the eponymous wines are produced.

A still wine is produced (the base wine). The wine is then re-fermented in bottles.

There’s a lot more to both methods. And between now and New Year’s, we’ll be looking carefully and how sparkling wine is made. But this is a great place to start.

Lini makes both tank method and classic method Lambrusco. And it also produces classic method Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

Stay tuned! More sparkling wine education coming your way!

Thanks for being here.

Here’s what Food & Wine magazine executive wine editor Ray Isle had to say about Lini Lambrusco when he first tasted them back in 2007 (“Not Your Grandmother’s Lambrusco”):

These are fresh, vibrant sparkling wines, ideal for summer drinking, and not overwhelmingly expensive, either.

Lini Lambrusco Blanco: White Lambrusco is actually quite common in Emilia-Romagna, though it’s virtually unknown here. Made without any skin contact, this has a scent of red apples and white grapes, and a racy zestiness that makes it an ideal aperitif wine.

Lini Lambrusco Rosé: Crisp strawberry aromas, and bright strawberry-cherry… This is made from the Sorbara grape variety, whose light skin naturally supplies the pale red color.

Lini Lambrusco Rosso: The brisk bubbles in this scour your tongue in an entirely appealing way, while the fresh, crushed-berry fruit and mild hint of earthiness give a hint as to how good this would be paired with a plate of grilled lamb chops.

Here’s what Los Angeles Times wine writer S. Irene Virbila had to say about Lini when she first tasted the wine (from the archives):

Lambrusco, the sparkling red wine from the Po Valley in Italy’s Emilia region, hasn’t had a great rep in this country. But when it’s made well, as in … “Labrusca” from Fabio Lini and family, who have been making the stuff since 1910, it can be a thing of rare beauty. Rich and lush, lightly sparkling and low in alcohol, it’s a perfect picnic wine for a hot summer day, great with salumi or your finest prosciutto, lusty pasta dishes and juicy grilled sausages.

Lini also makes an intriguing Lambrusco rose that you can find at some of the same shops as the red.

Runner’s World magazine isn’t exactly the kind of publication where you would expect to find a recommendation for Lambrusco. Or for any wine for that matter.

But a few years ago, Lini Lambrusco fan Joe Campanale — renowned American sommelier and restaurateur — published this piece for the masthead, “The Perfect Wine for Runners’ Favorite Foods: New York sommelier and marathoner Joe Campanale offers tips for pairing wines with various meals and desserts.”

His favorite runners’ food pairing for Lambrusco? Burgers.

“If you’re at a barbecue,” he wrote, “you want a wine that is cold yet pairs well with meat. Lini 910 Lambrusco Rosso is a terrific value.”

Who knew that runners were such big burger lovers?

A veteran runner of marathons and owner of some of New York’s leading Italian restaurants and wine destinations, Joe interviewed Alicia for a 2015 episode of “In the Drink,” the popular wine show on Heritage Radio Netowrk.

“We sip a Lini 910 Lambrusco Rosso Emilia 2011,” wrote one of our favorite American wine writers Ellen Bhang a few years ago for the Boston Globe, “offered by the glass, paired with a platter of prosciutto, olives, and cheeses. The frothy, chilled red cuts through the richness of the nibbles, leaving us craving more. Tonight, that’s all of the inspiration we need.”

And here’s what she had to say about the Labrusca Rosso, one of her top wines for the piece: “A lovely, rich style with fine froth and deep color to match. Soil and saline aromas lead to a palate of black cherry and food-friendly acidity.”

New York restaurateur Joe Campanale first made a splash when he opened dell’Anima in the city in 2007. It quickly became one of top destinations in the U.S. for contemporary Italian cuisine and artisanal Italian wines.

Later came wine bar Anfora and what would soon become another Italian classic, L’Artusi.

His latest project is the recently opened Fausto in Brooklyn.

He’s one of the most beloved Italian restaurant owners in the country and he’s a leading experts in Italian wind and food today. A favorite of the New York wine and food media, he also appears regularly on national television to talk about Italian cuisine.

A few years ago, Joe interviewed Alicia for Heritage Network Radio.

Click here for the interview.

Joe is a big fan of the wines and Alicia couldn’t have been more thrilled to get to be on his show.

Image via the Heritage Network Radio website.