American friends and wine lovers,

As you are probably already aware, the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) is currently considering the implementation of 100 percent tariffs on wines produced in the European Union, including Italian wines.

Using the first two links below, you can writes to your representatives in congress expressing your concern (it takes just a few clicks to fill out the form and generate a pre-written “form” letter that will be sent to your senators and your congressperson).

The third link can be used to post a comment on the USTR website. The deadline for submitting comments to the USTR is Monday, January 13.

Thank you for making your voice heard.

Write to your senators (via the National Association of Wine Retailers):
https://account.votility.com/enterprise/NAWR/ec/697

To your congressperson (via the National Association of Wine Retailers):
https://account.votility.com/enterprise/NAWR/ec/698

To the United States Trade Representative (USTR):
https://www.regulations.gov/comment?D=USTR-2019-0003-2518

The deadline to register your concern with the USTR is Monday, January 13.

It seemed like Lini was EVERYWHERE this holiday season!

Forbes called Lini Lambrusco one of “Four Great Bottles Of Bubbly To Pop On New Year’s Eve”.

Town and Country named Lini Lambrusco one of the best wines to pair with meat dishes (“From oysters and caviar to fried chicken, here’s what to eat with your next bottle of bubbly”).

Cooking Light included Lini Lambrusco in its sparkling wine buying guide.

And one of our favorite wine bloggers and wine educators, Tracy Ellen Kamens, Ed.D., DWS, CWE, posted tasting notes for two of her favorite wines by Lini.

Here’s what she had to say about the wines (below).

We hope you had a great holiday season! Looking forward to a sparkling 2020! Happy new year!

Lini 910 NV Lambrusco Rosé

Typical of the region, this wine is produced by the Charmat Method, the same method used in the production of Prosecco. This process retains the fresh fruit flavors of the grapes, which are present on the nose and palate of this lovely wine. Floral, fresh herbs and ripe cherries greet the nose and persist on the palate, with medium+ body, freshness and long length.

Lini 910 2006 Lambrusco Metodo Classico Rosso Millesimato

As a Metodo Classico wine, this Lambrusco was crafted using the Traditional Method, the same production technique used in Champagne, whereby the wine spends a significant amount of time in contact with the spent yeast (aka lees). Given its more complex production, this wine offered up beautiful notes of yeast, cherries and berries. The rich blackberry flavors were balanced with lively acidity and very long length.

Image via the It’s A Winederful Life blog.

“This very dry, earthy, ruby-red version,” writes leading wine critic Elin McCoy for Bloomberg this month, “is like liquid cranberries, perfect for drinking while you wrap presents.”

It’s one of her “fun fizz” recommendations for her widely followed “50 Best Wines under $50” column this year.

Click here for all of her picks.

Happy holidays, everyone!

“I’m just going to come out and say it,” writes Epicurious associate editor Joe Sevier this month. “Thanks to its deep, juicy flavor and lightly sparkling body, Lambrusco is the only wine you need to serve at Thanksgiving 2019.”

We couldn’t agree more!

He recommended two of Lini’s wines for this year’s Thanksgiving feast. See what he had to say in his tasting notes below.

And check out his article on “why Lambrusco is the only wine you need for Thanksgiving” here.

It’s one of the best Thanksgiving wine pieces this year, funny and intelligent, with great insights into why Lambrusco makes for the ideal Thanksgiving pairing. Thank you, Joe! We loved this article (and not just because we’re mentioned in it)!

Here are his tasting notes:

    Lini 910 ‘Labrusca’ Lambrusco Rosso: This bright, tart wine comes from Lini 910, an Italian producer that’s become pretty synonymous with modern Lambrusco in America. This offering is a little intense to drink on its own, but the sour, pungent, blueberry notes make it a great addition to a spread of turkey, stuffing, gravy, and green bean casserole. Save it for dinnertime.
    Lini 910 In Correggio Lambrusco Scuro: This just off-dry bottling has those plummy, juicy flavors that you might favor in a Pinot Noir, and finishes clean and bright. It’s grapey and fizzy and crowd-pleasing.

Above: Alicia examines a bottle of Lini classic method wine “aging on its lees.” As she holds it up to the light, you can see the “lees,” the sediment, in the bottom of the bottle.

What is “lees aging”? And why is it important in the production of sparkling wine?

You often hear wine trade professionals talk about this phase, a very particular one, in the sparkling winemaking process but few can really tell you what it means and why it’s a fundamental element in sparkling wine production.

Sparkling wine is always produced by fermenting the wine twice, the second time in a pressurized environment (either a tank or in the case of classic method wines, in bottles).

After the second fermentation of the wine, the wine is aged “on its lees.” Lees are the sediment (the solids) produced as a byproduct of fermentation. They are made up mostly of dead yeast cells (fermentation is the process of yeast converting sugar into alcohol) and cells from the grape must.

It’s during the period of lees aging that the wine develops a lot of its flavors and texture. In general, the longer the wine is aged on its lees, the better.