Liquor.com – December 21, 2020

In “The 20 Best Sparkling Wines to Drink in 2020,” Vicki Denig recommends the best sparkling wines to celebrate with this year, with input from Sam Stoppelmoor, Wine Director and General Manager at La Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels in New York. Among them:

LINI 910 Labrusca Rosso NV (Best Sparkling Red)

“There’s a reason why Italians drink lambrusco all day long – it’s fruity, it’s relatively low alcohol, and it’s seriously tasty. Lini ‘910’ is produced from sustainably-farmed fruit via the Martinotti (Charmat) method. Flavors of ripe red fruit and forest berries jump from the wine’s juicy palate – think of this stuff like grape juice for adults. Sip with Asian takeout favorites, pizza, or barbecue dishes.”

Uproxx – December 19, 2020

In “Sauce Up Your Pizza Night With These Wines Under $35,” Janice Williams recommends wines to “elevate even the most basic of mid-week pizza nights.” Among them:

LINI 910 Labrusca Bianco NV

“Hailing from the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy, this is a white wine that’s drier than the napkin you’ll need to dab your grease-covered lips with after biting into a white pie. And yet, somehow, it displays a level of freshness that balances the decadent ricotta and olive oil topping on that classic pizza iteration. Because this is made completely of Salamino grapes, the smells of crisp pear and hard lemon candies from your grandmother’s purse spill out the bottle. On the palate, this wine is intense with stony acidity – probably a nod to the cement vats it’s aged in. It displays crisp expressions of citrus that last throughout its generous lingering finish. You know those pizzas that are so amazingly decadent that it’s hard to breathe after wolfing down a slice? Well, this wine is the dry, frothy air to revive your lungs. Wash out your palate with this, and get ready for the next bite.”

We couldn’t have been more thrilled to learn that the Lini Lambrusco Labrusca Rosso has been included in prestigious Wine Spectator list of of top 100 wines under $25!

See the list here.

“All of the wines are rated 88 points or higher,” write the magazine’s editors, “priced at $25 or less and made in large enough quantities to be widely available.”

Lini was also included in this year’s Opera Wine, the Vinitaly-Wine Spectator list of top Italian wineries. Historically, Lini was the first Lambrusco producer to ever make the cut (in 2016)!

We couldn’t be more thrilled to share the news that the Lini family and its wines are featured in the December issue of Food & Wine magazine.

“To some people,” writes Food & Wine executive wine editor Ray Isle, “it might come as a surprise that there is good Lambrusco. The wine’s image has long battled against the impression that it’s a slightly sweet, innocuous, fizzy pink drink… But traditional Lambrusco is dry and crisp, an excellent foil for the rich food of Emilia-Romagna. Alicia’s father, Fabio, who makes the Lini wine, says, ‘If you drink a glass of 15% alcohol wine, you get drunk on one glass. With Lambrusco, you can drink more glasses — quality with quantity ! — and not feel bad. Balance and drinkability is our goal. And that the day after, you feel good.”

The magazine should be hitting newsstands and bookstores early next week.

Check out “Pop Fizz Feast: In the hills of Emilia-Romagna, a Lambrusco-making family uncorks the holiday season with a joyful meal — and plenty of great sparkling wine,” including Alicia’s family recipes for their holiday celebration.

There’s a saying often repeated among American food and wine professionals (the first time our American blogger heard it, it was uttered by legendary restaurateur Danny Meyer): If it grows with it, it goes with it.

We just loved this post by veteran wine blogger and writer Vicki Denig on “The wines to drink with 7 iconic Italian dishes.”

White truffles from Piedmont? Nebbiolo (check!)

Bistecca fiorentina? Chianti (is there any other?)

Trenette with Pesto? Vermentino (so good)

And, of course, ragù alla bolognese? None other than Lambrusco!

When you travel to Emilia, you’ll find that the Emilians drink nothing but Lambrusco. It’s the canonical pairing for their style of cooking and their famous food products (Prosciutto di Parma, Culatello, salumi, Parmigiano Reggiano, etc.).

Italy’s intrinsic regionalism is part of what makes the mosaic of its gastronomy so fascinating and compelling.

We couldn’t have been more thrilled that Vicki recommended our wines in her post.

Thank you, Vicki!

Click here for the post.

Another Lambrusco rosato that I absolutely love is the Lini Labrusca Rosato,” wrote top wine blogger Katrina René on her popular site Corkscrew Concierge last week.

“I’ve had it on a few occasions and love it on its own as well as with Cajun and Creole cuisine. In fact, I love anything from Lini.”

Check out her wonderful post on Italian rosé here.

Thank you, Kat! You rock!

“Never one to follow trends,” writes leading wine writer and educator Wanda Mann (above), author of the popular Wine With Wanda blog, “Lini makes their traditional dry style of Lambrusco the same way they always have, including the use of hand riddling, to create wines that are fresh and food-friendly with brilliant fruit flavors.”

Wanda recently featured an interview with Alicia on her Instagram: Check it out here.

Wanda is one of the wine world’s rising stars and leading voices and we couldn’t be more thrilled that she took time out to connect with Alicia and taste a few wines together. See the post for her tasting notes and the interview.

Thank you, Wanda! You are awesome!

Image via Wanda’s Facebook.

“Lambrusco’s Comeback, and Why It’s Brushing Shoulders with Rosé”
Jenn Rice
Vogue

In Emilia-Romagna, one of Italy’s most prized gastronomic treasures, Lambrusco is to Italians as coffee is to Americans. The frothy, refreshing, bubbly red can be spotted at every restaurant table, most likely accompanied by something mouthwatering of the Prosciutto di Parma or Culatello di Zibello nature.

Click here to continue reading…