Alicia Lini recently came across this 20018 Rolling Stone review by Filippo Polidori, one of Italy’s leading influencers. In his article, he pairs Lini Lambrusco Scuro with Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run” and he quotes “his friend” Oliviero Toscani, the celebrated Italian photographer.

Their conclusion? There is no wine hipper than Lambrusco.

We’ve translated the piece in its entirety here. Enjoy!

Did you know that Lambrusco used to be as popular in the U.S. as it was in Italy?

By the end of the 1970s, 50 percent of the Italian wine exported to the U.S. was Lambrusco, although that trend changed.

But as often happens, neither man nor the market are always grateful.

Despite the hard work of Lambrusco producers, for years their wines were consumed almost exclusively in the region where they were produced.

25 years later Lambrusco has returned and people are talking about it.

Today [2008], Lambrusco is the biggest selling wine in Brazil.

Its popularity is owed to its simplicity, to its directness.

Once, when I happened to be talking with my friend, the often genius Oliverio Toscani [the famous Italian photographer], he offered this definition:

“A wine that got around because it was an easy hook-up.”

Lambrusco’s strength comes from its easygoing nature. But it’s also what holds it back.

In recent years, concentrated, muscular, steroid-driven wines have been the trend. And simplicity is seen as banality.

But despite these challenges, Lambrusco has returned to the top and people love it again. It’s “vintage” and young people like that.

Oliveri Toscani had this to say: “Lambrusco is the true wine of Italy. It’s like Marcello Mastroianni. Who could be better than him to represent Italy? Lambrusco has an Italian face. But we Italians are embarrassed by it because it’s not trendy. It’s ridiculous. Actually, Lambrusco is trendy, more so than other wines! If Italians were truly chic, they would get it.”

This is Lambrusco! A human wine that allows you to drink well without expecting payback.

When I sat down to write this article, I picked a CD that represented two different musical souls: Rock and folk.

Bruce Springsteen is just the right artist and “Born to Run” is the perfect sound track.

The wine I chose is Lini 910 Lambrusco Scuro.

From the moment you pour it into the glass, the brilliant ruby red color and the aromas of cherry and strawberry let you know you are with someone “simpatico.” This Lambrusco needs no introduction to be appreciated. It’s testament to simplicity’s greatness.

Filippo Polidori
Rolling Stone (Italia)
February 2008

We couldn’t be more thrilled to share the news that the editors of Wine Spectator have named Lini Lambrusco Labrusca Rosé their “top best value sparkling wine under $20”!

See their post here (available to non-subscribers as well).

“Lively, with citrusy acidity and a zesty bead,” writes senior editor for Italy and sparkling wine Alison Napjus, “this light ruby rosé offers crushed raspberry, white peach, herb and spice notes.”

This year will be Lini’s biggest ever in the U.S. And there couldn’t be a better way to start 2019 off than this extraordinary accolade from the leading resource on fine wine in America today.

Happy new year, everyone! Please stay tuned…

Earlier this year, Ian D’Agata, the world’s leading English-language Italian-focused ampelographer and one of the top tasters working in the field (a senior editor at Antonio Galloni’s Vinous), tasted and scored Lini wines, giving them 91 points across the board. Here are his scores and notes.

Lini NV Lambrusco Labrusca Rosso
91 points

Bright ruby with a strong mousse of small bubbles. Fragrant aromas of blueberries and strawberry are similar to the flavors. Zingy acidity provides lift and clarity on the long bright finish. A blend of 85% Lambrusco Salamino and 15% Lambrusco Ancellotta made with secondary fermentation in autoclave for three months.

Lini NV Lambrusco Scuro
91 points

Deep ruby. Very fruity forward nose of red berries, black cherry and tar. Then hints of licorice and underbrush mingle with the dark cherry and berry flavors. Finishes long with zingy acidity and a creamy touch. A blend of 85% Lambrusco Salamino and 15% Ancellotta that spends six months on the lees. Made with the Charmat Martinotti method (in autoclave).

Lini 2004 Lambrusco Metodo Classico
91 points

Deep red with a strong mousse. Overtly fruity nose of red cherry, red berries and aromatic herbs. Then juicy and fresh, with a building austerity in the middle and zingy acidity nicely framing the red berry and herbal flavors.

Above: Last year, Lini wines and Alicia Lini were featured in the pages of Vogue.

From Wine Spectator to the Boston Globe, from Food & Wine magazine to Decanter, Lini wines have appeared in nearly every one of the world’s major wine publications.

We’ve collected them, including English-language translations of Italian reviews, in this thread.

And you can also download a “highlights reel” here (PDF). It includes the Wine Spectator Top 100 Italian Wines list where Lini became the first-ever Lambrusco to make the cut.

It’s a great tool for wine shops and wine retailers as we head in to the final stretch of the holiday season.

Happy Holidays, everyone! Happy Lambrusco!

Here are some tweets from some of our favorite American wine writers…

Please follow us on Twitter @Lini910. We’ll follow back!

We were thrilled to learn that leading Italian wine writer Daniele Cernilli (aka Doctor Wine) and his editors have named Lini’s 2006 In Correggio Rosso Millesimato a “best monovarietal wine” in its category (Lambrusco), giving it a whopping 95 points.

Earlier this year, Cernilli wrote that the wine is “not only the best Lambrusco of the year, it’s one of the best ever.”

(He and his editors awarded it “best Labmrusco” in their 2019 guide to the wines of Italy, which was published this month.)

Here’s what Food & Wine magazine executive wine editor Ray Isle had to say about Lini Lambrusco when he first tasted them back in 2007 (“Not Your Grandmother’s Lambrusco”):

These are fresh, vibrant sparkling wines, ideal for summer drinking, and not overwhelmingly expensive, either.

Lini Lambrusco Blanco: White Lambrusco is actually quite common in Emilia-Romagna, though it’s virtually unknown here. Made without any skin contact, this has a scent of red apples and white grapes, and a racy zestiness that makes it an ideal aperitif wine.

Lini Lambrusco Rosé: Crisp strawberry aromas, and bright strawberry-cherry… This is made from the Sorbara grape variety, whose light skin naturally supplies the pale red color.

Lini Lambrusco Rosso: The brisk bubbles in this scour your tongue in an entirely appealing way, while the fresh, crushed-berry fruit and mild hint of earthiness give a hint as to how good this would be paired with a plate of grilled lamb chops.