We are thrilled share the video below, produced by Grape Collective, one of the leading wine blogs in the U.S.

The interview was conducted by Grape Collective founder and editor-in-chief, Christopher Barnes, one of our favorite American wine writers.

Over the course of their conversation, Christopher asks Alicia to talk about Lambrusco’s “complicated” nature and history.

“Lambrusco is a very simple wine that comes from a very complicated story,” she tells him. “Because in the past, it’s been destroyed, the name and the fame, because it’s been produced in a very quick way. You can produce, obtain a sparkling Lambrusco in three days, in a week, but our entry level products will stay in the big tank for at least three months. So between a week and three months, there is a world of difference.”

Click the video below for the complete interview or click here for the transcription.

ARTISANAL LAMBRUSCO WITH ALICIA LINI
Ben O’Donnell
Wine Spectator

At Lini910, a new generation evangelizes for a crisp, dry, quality style of the Italian fizz…

Lambrusco has been produced by many generations of winemakers, but each seems to find it in a different guise. A century ago, vintners studied and emulated the methods of Champagne. More recently, they blitzed shelves with a sweet, fizzy, simple red. Today, as the popularity and diversity of bubbly around the world surges, many Lambrusco houses are returning to an emphasis on brut styles, old-school vinification methods, terroir specificity or all of the above, making frizzante and spumante wines of complexity, distinction and tremendous value.

Among the leaders of this new wave of old-school producers in Emilia-Romagna is Lini Oreste & Figli, branded Lini910, for 1910, the year the Lini family founded its operation, making both wine and balsamic vinegar.

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