This week, the Corriere della Sera (one of Italy’s top daily newspapers, the Italian “New York Times”) featured Lini’s wines as a top gift idea. Click here for the link (in Italian).

If ever there were a wine synonymous with joy, it’s Lambrusco: It sparkles, it bubbles, it tickles, and it rewards the wine lover with rich aromas and food-friendly flavors.

And as the editors of Food and Wine magazine declared recently, it’s the perfect wine to accompany the foods that we Americans eat during the holiday season.

This year, give the gift of Lambrusco as you share the season’s joy!

Above: Last year, Lini wines and Alicia Lini were featured in the pages of Vogue.

From Wine Spectator to the Boston Globe, from Food & Wine magazine to Decanter, Lini wines have appeared in nearly every one of the world’s major wine publications.

We’ve collected them, including English-language translations of Italian reviews, in this thread.

And you can also download a “highlights reel” here (PDF). It includes the Wine Spectator Top 100 Italian Wines list where Lini became the first-ever Lambrusco to make the cut.

It’s a great tool for wine shops and wine retailers as we head in to the final stretch of the holiday season.

Happy Holidays, everyone! Happy Lambrusco!

That’s Jayne Battle, above, owner and namesake of Jaynes Gastropub in San Diego, one of our favorite restaurants in California.

Last week, after Food & Wine magazine called Lambrusco “the perfect Thanksgiving wine,” Jayne and her husband Jon put Lini Lambrusco to the Thanksgiving test: Lini Lambrusco was the official pairing for their Thanksgiving 2018!

Sending a big shout-out and lots of love to Jayne, Jon, and the whole team at Jaynes. Thank you, guys! We can’t wait to get back out there in early 2019.

Happy holidays!

P.S. Whatcha pouring for Christmas? 😉

Here are some tweets from some of our favorite American wine writers…

Please follow us on Twitter @Lini910. We’ll follow back!

It seems like just yesterday that we asked whether or not Lambrusco could be the perfect Thanksgiving wine (well, actually, it was last week).

So it came as no surprise to us when the editors of Food & Wine published this piece on Friday: “What is Lambrusco — and Why It Could Be the Perfect Thanksgiving Red Wine.”

“A Thanksgiving dinner,” writes Jillian Kramer for the magazine, “is reason to celebrate — with a refreshing, versatile red wine, that is. According to the sommeliers we spoke with, Lambrusco is one of the best wines to pour for a holiday toast or to sip alongside a six-course meal.”

One of the wine professionals she talks to tells her, “the intense red fruit — think, cherry and strawberry — flavors of dry Lambrusco would complement game birds, turkey and ham,” some of the classic fixings for the Thanksgiving piece.

It’s a great article chock full of useful information about Lambrusco and why it works so well at a meal like the Thanksgiving feast.

Check it out here. And thank you, Jillian, for loving Lambrusco as much as we do!

Photo: A Thanksgiving plate in Southeast Texas by our blogger Jeremy Parzen aka Do Bianchi.

We loved Eric Asimov’s column last week for the New York Times, notes from his yearly Thanksgiving tasting panel.

In it he writes:

    We emphasize that choosing wines for Thanksgiving is not an exercise in pairing. The meal — especially the sort of potluck buffet where guests bring all sorts of family favorites — is too complex and disparate to worry about precision matching.
    Instead, we suggest picking versatile wines that go with many different sorts of flavors. And we are wary of wines that are more than 14 percent alcohol.

Eric and his tasting panel didn’t taste or recommend any Lambrusco for this year’s Thanksgiving feast (although Eric is a HUGE Lambrusco fan and he has recommended Lini Lambrusco many times in his columns over the years).

But we really appreciated what he had to say about picking versatile wines that go with many different flavors.

That’s Lambrusco to a tee!

We were also struck by his advice: We are wary of wines that are more than 14 percent alcohol.

One of the best things about Lambrusco is its restrained alcohol, usually around 11 percent (far below the threshold that Eric recommends).

Another thing that he recommends is economy in selecting Thanksgiving wines. Each year, he caps the bottle price at $25.

He writes:

    We imagine an unruly feast, with lots of people, perhaps served buffet-style. For a big group, chances are nobody will want an exorbitant wine bill, hence our price cap.

Versatility in pairing?
Restrained alcohol?
Value?

The answer is spelled L I N I  L A M B R U S C O!