The Winebow/Leonardo LoCascio Selections (LLS) Vini d’Italia (Wines of Italy) tour is one of the American wine trade’s major traveling tastings and features hundreds of Italian wines and their producers.

Alicia Lini will be pouring and talking about her family’s wines at all three events this year.

Click here to view the LLS Tasting Booklet and/or click the links below to register.

Minneapolis MN
Monday, May 6, 2019
12 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Hilton Canopy Minneapolis Mill District
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Durham NC
Tuesday, May 7, 2019
1 p.m. – 5 p.m.
JB Duke Hotel
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Portland ME
Thursday, May 9, 2019
12 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Westin Portland Harborview
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

We just had to share this glowing review of our 2005 Lambrusco Metodo Classico by a favorite Italian wine writer, Giovanna Romeo. Here’s what she had to say about our wine on Vino e Cibo, one of Italy’s most popular food and wine blogs and online magazines. Thank you, Giovanna!

It’s vintage-dated 2005. Yes, you got that right. It’s 2005.

More than 10 years of aging on the lees plus just the right amount of time since disgorgement for a sensational glass.

A truly great wine, intense and vibrant, endowed with gorgeous acidity that keeps it freshly and totally balanced. No sign of aging here. Just complex aromas and flavors: Citrus notes of blood orange, wild berries, wild strawberries and raspberries, radish and rhubarb. Delicious, extremely delicious, approachable with creamy, fine, and intense bubbles. Rich and succulent in the mouth, this is a Lambrusco that sheds off its humble origins and rises up to true excellence.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you “the” Lambrusco.

Giovanna Romeo
Vino e Cibo
April 2019

“The Bacchanalia,” writes Daniel Kriger this week for PUNCH, “was born out of the challenge to create a cocktail that would transcend rules and traditional flavor profiles to appeal to all types of drinkers.”

One of the cocktail’s ingredients is Lambrusco, “preferably Lini” he specifies.

Click here for the recipe.

Increasingly, mixologists across the U.S. have been using Lambrusco as an ingredient in the new cocktails they are creating.

We couldn’t have been more thrilled to see Lini mentioned in PUNCH, the leading online journal in the U.S. today for cocktails and wine.

Image via PUNCH.

For those of you attending Vinitaly this year, we hope to see you at the Lini stand: Hall 3, Stand C6.

The Lini family couldn’t be more thrilled to share the news that its wines are now imported to the U.S. by Winebow-Leonardo LoCascio Selections — the leading importer of Italian wines in America.

Founded in 1980, Winebow has reshaped the Italian wine market in the U.S. by introducing some of Italy’s most iconic wineries to American restaurateurs, retailers, and consumers. Today, its distribution network is considered the gold standard among Italian wine trade members and observers.

“Each wine in the collection tells a unique story about the family and region that produced it. A taste through the portfolio is a journey across Italy’s rich spectrum of geography, history, and culture” (from the Winebow-Leonardo LoCascio Selections website).

Lini will take part this year in the Winebow-Leonardo LoCascio Selections Vini d’Italia tour in May and the wines, which have already landed in the U.S., will be available shortly.

For those of you attending Vinitaly this year, we hope to see you at the Lini stand: Hall 3, Stand C6.

Last week we posted about a creative/international pairing for Lambrusco (Lambrusco and fried boudin balls).

So this week we thought we’d do a post about one of Lambrusco’s most traditional and unquestionably canonical pairings: salumi, the Italian word for charcuterie.

Salumi are produced in every one of Italy’s 20 regions.

But there is no region more closely associated with salumi than Emilia.

And there’s also no place in Italy where salumi are so central to the cuisine.

That’s partly owed to the fact that salumi in Emilia are considered one of the greatest expressions of Emilian terroir.

That’s a slice of culatello above, the air-dried salume made from the pig’s rump. It can only be cured in Emilia and most experts agree that it’s unique aroma, flavor, and texture is the result of process that relies heavily on Emilia’s unique climatic conditions.

In fact, you can reproduce the process in other parts of the world, as many have. But you can never replicate the aromas, flavors, and textures that you obtain in the spiritual homeland of salumi.

The same holds for prosciutto (made from the pig’s thigh) and other iconic salumi from Emilia.

The canonical pairing for this most canonical of foods?

Canonically, exclusively, and absolutely LAMBRUSCO!