It’s not every week that you discover that your wine is being poured in the legendary Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the “historic heart” of Harvard University!

This week and next, Grafton Street Pub — a favorite destination for students and professors — is serving Lini Lambrusco as part of their Winter Dine Out menu (check it out on the Harvard Square website!).

The pairing? Tuna tartare with avocado yogurt, black radish, sesame, togarashi wonton chips.

Sound delicious!

The menu, with wine pairings, is available through March 15.

Go Crimson!

Grafton Street Pub & Grill
1230 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge MA 02138
(617) 497-0400
Google map

Image via the Grafton Street Facebook.

Above: Classic smoked beef rib, a staple of Texas BBQ, served on a croissant in Houston, Texas.

Earlier this week, I was invited to speak at a private gathering with three of Houston’s leading “pit masters” (otherwise known as “smokers,” pit masters smoke meat; the name comes from the fact that in another era, the meat was smoked over a pit of smoking embers).

Our task was to determine what Italian wines go best with Texas BBQ (please keep in mind that the term barbecue has a particular meaning in Texas: it denotes “dry-rub” smoked meats, mostly beef, that have been seasoned solely with dry spices, mostly salt and pepper).

As someone who has been working in Italian wine for more than 20 years, I have no doubt that Lambrusco is the ideal wine pairing for Texas BBQ, even better imho than beer.

When it was my turn to speak, here’s the analogy I drew.

One of the most iconic dishes in Emilian cuisine is boiled meats. A number of different cuts of meat, including beef round and tongue and chicken, are slow-cooked together in simmering water and then are sliced and served accompanied by mostarda, spicy pickled fruits.

It is served exclusively, solely, and canonically with Lambrusco.

You have all of the elements of Texas BBQ — minus the smoke.

Protein? Check.

Fat? Check.

Tender, melt-in-your-mouth texture? Check.

Heat (in the form of mostarda, akin to the spicy vinegar-based sauces served with Texas BBQ)? Check.

The parallels are all there (again, minus the smoke and smokiness).

And so I rest my case: Lambrusco is the ULTIMATE pairing for Texas BBQ!

Don’t believe me? Come visit me in Texas and the ‘cue and the Lambrusco is on me!

Jeremy Parzen
Lini blogmaster

We call it “historic” because Alicia’s 2007 interview on WNYC public radio in New York is what helped to launch Lini wines in New York and the U.S. more than a decade ago. That’s where the story began. And the rest is “history.”

Click here to listen to the show. It’s a great way to understand what an uphill battle it was for Alicia when she first brought her family’s wines to New York.

Back in 2007, wine lovers’ perceptions of Lambrusco was much different than today.

Alicia helped to change those perceptions and she paved the way for countless other Lambrusco producers who followed in her footsteps.

It’s a really great show. You won’t regret it…

The Lini Lambrusco USA blogger visited the winery in Correggio last week and snapped the above photo.

That label, with the distinctive Bacchus drawing, was created expressly for a village fair that Lini hosted in 1972.

It would later be used, starting in the first decade of this century, as the now iconic label for Lini’s Lambrusco “Labrusca.”

Lini’s roots stretch back four generations in the world of Lambrusco and Italian wine. The family’s history is rich with cultural treasures — like this now unmistakable label, a Lambrusco icon!

Some people point to Shakespeare’s celebrated line from “Romeo and Juliet” as one of the most famous instances when a rose is invoked to express love and passion.

What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet.

But the rose’s long association with romance goes back much further.

In fact, we have to reach back to the 13th-century French allegorical poem known as the Róman de la Rose or Romance of the Rose.

At the outset of this story of courtly love, the narrator tells us:

If anyone asks what I wish the romance to be called, which I begin here, it is the Romance of the Rose, in which the whole art of love is contained. Its matter is good and new; and God grant that she for whom I have undertaken it may receive it with grace. It is she who is so precious and so worthy to be loved that she should be called Rose.

Since the Middle Ages, the rose and the color of the rose have been associated with romance.

It’s no wonder that our Valentine’s Day celebrations are always rose-hued!

What will you be drinking on Valentine’s Day this year?

For your consideration: Wine Spectator’s “BEST VALUE SPARKLING” — Lini Lambrusco Rosé.

For your consideration…

Valentine’s Day is around the corner and we know that a lot of you are making plans to celebrate the holiday with that special someone. And we know that for many of you, picking the right wine is key to making the event memorable.

Here are some of the reasons we think that Lini Lambrusco Rosé is the ultimate Valentine’s Day wine.

1) It’s pink. The rose color is a perfect match for the holiday.

2) It sparkles. It’s a truly joyous wine and a great conversation starter.

3) It’s super food-friendly and can be paired with a wide variety of cuisines, perfect for date night when you night need pairing options.

4) Its alcohol is restrained. You definitely want a wine that you can enjoy liberally on Valentine’s Day.

5) It’s not cost-prohibitive. Opening a second bottle won’t break the bank.

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone!

Lini Lambrusco Labrusca — which include a white, rosé, and classic red Lambrusco — is one of our most popular labels in the U.S.

The colorful label was inspired by a label the winery created many years ago for a local food and wine festival.

Meant to evoke “a wine for the people,” the image on the hand-drawn label depicts a happy Bacchus enjoying his glass of Lambrusco.

The name Labrusca evokes the ancient name used by the Romans for wild grape varieties, vitis labrusca. To this day, the term denotes wild or naturally occurring grapes.