For those of you attending Vinitaly this year, we hope to see you at the Lini stand: Hall 3, Stand C6.

The Lini family couldn’t be more thrilled to share the news that its wines are now imported to the U.S. by Winebow-Leonardo LoCascio Selections — the leading importer of Italian wines in America.

Founded in 1980, Winebow has reshaped the Italian wine market in the U.S. by introducing some of Italy’s most iconic wineries to American restaurateurs, retailers, and consumers. Today, its distribution network is considered the gold standard among Italian wine trade members and observers.

“Each wine in the collection tells a unique story about the family and region that produced it. A taste through the portfolio is a journey across Italy’s rich spectrum of geography, history, and culture” (from the Winebow-Leonardo LoCascio Selections website).

Lini will take part this year in the Winebow-Leonardo LoCascio Selections Vini d’Italia tour in May and the wines, which have already landed in the U.S., will be available shortly.

For those of you attending Vinitaly this year, we hope to see you at the Lini stand: Hall 3, Stand C6.

Last week we posted about a creative/international pairing for Lambrusco (Lambrusco and fried boudin balls).

So this week we thought we’d do a post about one of Lambrusco’s most traditional and unquestionably canonical pairings: salumi, the Italian word for charcuterie.

Salumi are produced in every one of Italy’s 20 regions.

But there is no region more closely associated with salumi than Emilia.

And there’s also no place in Italy where salumi are so central to the cuisine.

That’s partly owed to the fact that salumi in Emilia are considered one of the greatest expressions of Emilian terroir.

That’s a slice of culatello above, the air-dried salume made from the pig’s rump. It can only be cured in Emilia and most experts agree that it’s unique aroma, flavor, and texture is the result of process that relies heavily on Emilia’s unique climatic conditions.

In fact, you can reproduce the process in other parts of the world, as many have. But you can never replicate the aromas, flavors, and textures that you obtain in the spiritual homeland of salumi.

The same holds for prosciutto (made from the pig’s thigh) and other iconic salumi from Emilia.

The canonical pairing for this most canonical of foods?

Canonically, exclusively, and absolutely LAMBRUSCO!

For those of you attending Vinitaly this year, we hope to see you at the Lini stand: Hall 3, Stand C6.

Few English-speaking readers beyond southeast Texas and Louisiana will know what boudin is.

Well, they might know European boudin noir, the classic blood sausage found in many countries across the continent and even in Italy.

But unless you’ve spent some time along the Gulf Coast of the southeastern U.S., otherwise known as lagniappe country, you’ve probably never experienced Cajun boudin.

Also known as boudin blanc, it’s a type of sausage made with pork, rice, and spices (here’s a cool video on how boudin is made).

One of the ways that boudin is typically served is as “boudin balls”: The sausage is de-cased, crumbled, formed into balls, and then battered and fried.

It’s a classic dish along the Gulf Coast where our English-language blogger Jeremy lives.

He and his family recently paired homemade boudin balls with Lini Lambrusco Labrusca Rosato.

“It’s a spicy dish,” said Jeremy, “and needs a really fresh wine. It’s also a really fat-laden dish that in many ways mirrors the pork-heavy diet of the Emilians. The acidity and the bright fruit flavors worked great with the heat and the fat. And the wine’s lithe character was a counterpoint to the ‘stick-to-your-ribs’ earthy character of the sausage.”

Could Lambrusco be the ultimate pairing for Cajun cuisine?

Based on this initial experience (the first in our ongoing research), it might just be!

For those of you attending Vinitaly this year, we hope to see you at the Lini stand: Hall 3, Stand C6.

Lini will also be poured in a fantastic flight of wines to be presented by Daniele Cernilli (above), one of Italy’s leading wine writers and wine critics.

On Sunday, April 7 (the first day of the fair), he’s leading a 2 p.m. seminar on sparkling wine that will include the Lini 2006 Lambrusco Metodo Classico.

It’s one not to miss!

Click here for info and registration details.

According to a feature story published in the finance section of the Italian national daily La Stampa last week, “Americans are going crazy for Italian sparkling wines.”

“Sparkling wine is leading ‘made in Italy’ wines in the U.S.,” writes the author of the piece.

“The most recent data shared by the [Italian] Trade Commission in America taste like an important milestone for Italy. In 2018, [Italian] wine exports grew by 6.8 percent in terms of value… the highest increase over the last 5 years and 1.2 percent higher than the previous year… the United States has established itself as the top market for Italian wine exports. It takes in roughly a quarter of the total number of bottles sold abroad.”

But the best news for sparkling wine producers is that Americans have become the leading consumers of Italian bubbles as well.

“Italy is the top supplier of white wines in the U.S., accounting for 40 percent of the market. It’s also the top supplier of red wines, accounting for 32.5 percent. And in the sparkling wine category, [Italy] dominates the market in terms of quantities with 57 percent of imports.”

At Vinitaly this year, Lini 910 will be sharing some big news as it begins a new chapter in its market presence in America. Stay tuned!

Alicia Lini recently came across this 20018 Rolling Stone review by Filippo Polidori, one of Italy’s leading influencers. In his article, he pairs Lini Lambrusco Scuro with Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run” and he quotes “his friend” Oliviero Toscani, the celebrated Italian photographer.

Their conclusion? There is no wine hipper than Lambrusco.

We’ve translated the piece in its entirety here. Enjoy!

Did you know that Lambrusco used to be as popular in the U.S. as it was in Italy?

By the end of the 1970s, 50 percent of the Italian wine exported to the U.S. was Lambrusco, although that trend changed.

But as often happens, neither man nor the market are always grateful.

Despite the hard work of Lambrusco producers, for years their wines were consumed almost exclusively in the region where they were produced.

25 years later Lambrusco has returned and people are talking about it.

Today [2008], Lambrusco is the biggest selling wine in Brazil.

Its popularity is owed to its simplicity, to its directness.

Once, when I happened to be talking with my friend, the often genius Oliverio Toscani [the famous Italian photographer], he offered this definition:

“A wine that got around because it was an easy hook-up.”

Lambrusco’s strength comes from its easygoing nature. But it’s also what holds it back.

In recent years, concentrated, muscular, steroid-driven wines have been the trend. And simplicity is seen as banality.

But despite these challenges, Lambrusco has returned to the top and people love it again. It’s “vintage” and young people like that.

Oliveri Toscani had this to say: “Lambrusco is the true wine of Italy. It’s like Marcello Mastroianni. Who could be better than him to represent Italy? Lambrusco has an Italian face. But we Italians are embarrassed by it because it’s not trendy. It’s ridiculous. Actually, Lambrusco is trendy, more so than other wines! If Italians were truly chic, they would get it.”

This is Lambrusco! A human wine that allows you to drink well without expecting payback.

When I sat down to write this article, I picked a CD that represented two different musical souls: Rock and folk.

Bruce Springsteen is just the right artist and “Born to Run” is the perfect sound track.

The wine I chose is Lini 910 Lambrusco Scuro.

From the moment you pour it into the glass, the brilliant ruby red color and the aromas of cherry and strawberry let you know you are with someone “simpatico.” This Lambrusco needs no introduction to be appreciated. It’s testament to simplicity’s greatness.

Filippo Polidori
Rolling Stone (Italia)
February 2008