Above: Last year, Lini wines and Alicia Lini were featured in the pages of Vogue.

From Wine Spectator to the Boston Globe, from Food & Wine magazine to Decanter, Lini wines have appeared in nearly every one of the world’s major wine publications.

We’ve collected them, including English-language translations of Italian reviews, in this thread.

And you can also download a “highlights reel” here (PDF). It includes the Wine Spectator Top 100 Italian Wines list where Lini became the first-ever Lambrusco to make the cut.

It’s a great tool for wine shops and wine retailers as we head in to the final stretch of the holiday season.

Happy Holidays, everyone! Happy Lambrusco!

Here are some tweets from some of our favorite American wine writers…

Please follow us on Twitter @Lini910. We’ll follow back!

On Sunday, our American blogger hosted a “Lambrusco and BBQ” party in Houston, Texas where he lives with his family.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you already know that Texas BBQ (not just BBQ but TEXAS bbq) has become a worldwide phenomenon. Even in outposts as far away as Brooklyn and Rome (yes, no joke!) and Napa, smokers are smoking dry-rub brisket just like the way they do it in the Lone Star state.

In Texas, they pair either ice tea or beer with BBQ.

But, as our blogger has discovered over his years in Texas, Lambrusco makes for the ideal pairing: Served cold, with gentle bubbles, a hint of sweetness, and the right balance of acidity and tannin to cut through the heat and fattiness of the ‘cue (as they call it down there), Lambrusco is a natural match for this style of cooking. And it makes perfect sense: Even though they don’t smoke their meats in Emilia, the spiritual homeland of Lambrusco, there are many parallels between the heartiness of the two culinary traditions.

Like no other, Lini embodies the joy of the Emilian people and their favorite wine, Lambrusco. That joy was on display last Sunday in Houston.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We were thrilled to learn that leading Italian wine writer Daniele Cernilli (aka Doctor Wine) and his editors have named Lini’s 2006 In Correggio Rosso Millesimato a “best monovarietal wine” in its category (Lambrusco), giving it a whopping 95 points.

Earlier this year, Cernilli wrote that the wine is “not only the best Lambrusco of the year, it’s one of the best ever.”

(He and his editors awarded it “best Labmrusco” in their 2019 guide to the wines of Italy, which was published this month.)

Here’s what Food & Wine magazine executive wine editor Ray Isle had to say about Lini Lambrusco when he first tasted them back in 2007 (“Not Your Grandmother’s Lambrusco”):

These are fresh, vibrant sparkling wines, ideal for summer drinking, and not overwhelmingly expensive, either.

Lini Lambrusco Blanco: White Lambrusco is actually quite common in Emilia-Romagna, though it’s virtually unknown here. Made without any skin contact, this has a scent of red apples and white grapes, and a racy zestiness that makes it an ideal aperitif wine.

Lini Lambrusco Rosé: Crisp strawberry aromas, and bright strawberry-cherry… This is made from the Sorbara grape variety, whose light skin naturally supplies the pale red color.

Lini Lambrusco Rosso: The brisk bubbles in this scour your tongue in an entirely appealing way, while the fresh, crushed-berry fruit and mild hint of earthiness give a hint as to how good this would be paired with a plate of grilled lamb chops.

Here’s what Los Angeles Times wine writer S. Irene Virbila had to say about Lini when she first tasted the wine (from the archives):

Lambrusco, the sparkling red wine from the Po Valley in Italy’s Emilia region, hasn’t had a great rep in this country. But when it’s made well, as in … “Labrusca” from Fabio Lini and family, who have been making the stuff since 1910, it can be a thing of rare beauty. Rich and lush, lightly sparkling and low in alcohol, it’s a perfect picnic wine for a hot summer day, great with salumi or your finest prosciutto, lusty pasta dishes and juicy grilled sausages.

Lini also makes an intriguing Lambrusco rose that you can find at some of the same shops as the red.