Here at our house, one of our favorite Sunday night traditions is steak and French fries dinner. We pan-fire prime New York strip steaks from our favorite local butcher and we roast hand-cut French fries.

Just to give the steak some added flavor, I’ll also sauté a large jalapeño pepper and some scallions in the same pan (I generally start cook the pepper and scallions before I add the steak, which I rub generously with kosher salt and freshly cracked pepper).

It’s all-American evening in Houston, Texas, where we also usually watch a movie together for the occasion.

Americans are so hung up on drinking “big” tannic wine with steak. They often think that Cabernet Sauvignon — and in particular, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, with its signature “big” style — is the only wine category worth of a great piece of beef.

It doesn’t occur to most that Lambrusco is actually a very tannic grape. And few know that it makes for a sublime pairing with charred steak like the ones we like to make a couple of times of month (after all, we have two little kids at home and steak is a great excuse to get them to enjoy protein).

Of course, like any good Texan, I like my steak served with a little bit of heat, hence the jalapeño and the habanero-based sauce I like to use with my beef.

That’s another reason why I like serving Lambrusco with steak: Because it’s served chilled and because it sparkles with freshness, the heat doesn’t overwhelm it the way it would a Nebbiolo or a tannic Pinot Noir, for example.

The next time you sit down to a great hunk of beef, pop open a bottle of Lambrusco. Trust me: you’ll thank us.

Jeremy Parzen
blog master

We call it “historic” because Alicia’s 2007 interview on WNYC public radio in New York is what helped to launch Lini wines in New York and the U.S. more than a decade ago. That’s where the story began. And the rest is “history.”

Click here to listen to the show. It’s a great way to understand what an uphill battle it was for Alicia when she first brought her family’s wines to New York.

Back in 2007, wine lovers’ perceptions of Lambrusco was much different than today.

Alicia helped to change those perceptions and she paved the way for countless other Lambrusco producers who followed in her footsteps.

It’s a really great show. You won’t regret it…

The Lini Lambrusco USA blogger visited the winery in Correggio last week and snapped the above photo.

That label, with the distinctive Bacchus drawing, was created expressly for a village fair that Lini hosted in 1972.

It would later be used, starting in the first decade of this century, as the now iconic label for Lini’s Lambrusco “Labrusca.”

Lini’s roots stretch back four generations in the world of Lambrusco and Italian wine. The family’s history is rich with cultural treasures — like this now unmistakable label, a Lambrusco icon!

Some people point to Shakespeare’s celebrated line from “Romeo and Juliet” as one of the most famous instances when a rose is invoked to express love and passion.

What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet.

But the rose’s long association with romance goes back much further.

In fact, we have to reach back to the 13th-century French allegorical poem known as the Róman de la Rose or Romance of the Rose.

At the outset of this story of courtly love, the narrator tells us:

If anyone asks what I wish the romance to be called, which I begin here, it is the Romance of the Rose, in which the whole art of love is contained. Its matter is good and new; and God grant that she for whom I have undertaken it may receive it with grace. It is she who is so precious and so worthy to be loved that she should be called Rose.

Since the Middle Ages, the rose and the color of the rose have been associated with romance.

It’s no wonder that our Valentine’s Day celebrations are always rose-hued!

What will you be drinking on Valentine’s Day this year?

For your consideration: Wine Spectator’s “BEST VALUE SPARKLING” — Lini Lambrusco Rosé.

For your consideration…

Valentine’s Day is around the corner and we know that a lot of you are making plans to celebrate the holiday with that special someone. And we know that for many of you, picking the right wine is key to making the event memorable.

Here are some of the reasons we think that Lini Lambrusco Rosé is the ultimate Valentine’s Day wine.

1) It’s pink. The rose color is a perfect match for the holiday.

2) It sparkles. It’s a truly joyous wine and a great conversation starter.

3) It’s super food-friendly and can be paired with a wide variety of cuisines, perfect for date night when you night need pairing options.

4) Its alcohol is restrained. You definitely want a wine that you can enjoy liberally on Valentine’s Day.

5) It’s not cost-prohibitive. Opening a second bottle won’t break the bank.

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone!

Lini Lambrusco Labrusca — which include a white, rosé, and classic red Lambrusco — is one of our most popular labels in the U.S.

The colorful label was inspired by a label the winery created many years ago for a local food and wine festival.

Meant to evoke “a wine for the people,” the image on the hand-drawn label depicts a happy Bacchus enjoying his glass of Lambrusco.

The name Labrusca evokes the ancient name used by the Romans for wild grape varieties, vitis labrusca. To this day, the term denotes wild or naturally occurring grapes.

We couldn’t be more thrilled to share the news that the editors of Wine Spectator have named Lini Lambrusco Labrusca Rosé their “top best value sparkling wine under $20”!

See their post here (available to non-subscribers as well).

“Lively, with citrusy acidity and a zesty bead,” writes senior editor for Italy and sparkling wine Alison Napjus, “this light ruby rosé offers crushed raspberry, white peach, herb and spice notes.”

This year will be Lini’s biggest ever in the U.S. And there couldn’t be a better way to start 2019 off than this extraordinary accolade from the leading resource on fine wine in America today.

Happy new year, everyone! Please stay tuned…