For 4 generations, the Lini family has been making top Lambrusco in the heart of Emilia, the land of Prosciutto di Parma and Parmigiano Reggiano.

The thing that sets their wines apart from the crowd of Lambrusco available today is the family’s patience and devotion: While most producers bottle their Lambruscos immediately (sometimes even the same week that they are made), the Lini family lets their Lambruscos age properly before bottling.

On Saturday, July 28 in San Diego, we will be tasting four of the family’s wines, each aged to create the clean, classic flavors of authentic Lambrusco.

Please join us a week from Saturday to taste these artisanal wines, made from estate-grown fruit:

Lini Lambrusco Labrusca Rosso
(aged 3 months, 85% Lambrusco Salamino, 15% Ancellotta)
Lini Lambrusco Correggio Rosato
(aged 6 months, 50% Lambrusco Salamino, 50% Sorbara)
Lini Lambrusco Correggio
(aged 6 months, 85% Lambrusco Salamino, 15% Ancellotta)
Lini Lambrusco Metodo Classico
(aged 12+ months, 100% Lambrusco Salamino)

LAMBRUSCO PARTY
SATURDAY JULY 28

3-5 p.m.
$15 per person

TASTE 4 WINES
with small bites by Jaynes

Jaynes Gastropub
4677 30th St.
San Diego CA 92116
(619) 563-1011
Google map

Please email Jeremy to register (not required but encouraged).

The Lini USA blog is making its first road trip of the summer!

On Saturday, July 28, Lini blogger Jeremy Parzen (aka Do Bianchi) will be pouring our Lambrusco at Jaynes Gastropub in San Diego (that’s San Diego’s Children’s Pool in La Jolla, above).

LAMBRUSCO PARTY
SATURDAY JULY 28

3-5 p.m.
$15 per person

TASTE 4 WINES
with small bites by Jaynes

Jaynes Gastropub
4677 30th St.
San Diego CA 92116
(619) 563-1011
Google map

Stay tuned for wines…

Please email Jeremy to register (not required but encouraged).

“Taste Test Winners: Italian Value Wines”
by Ray Isle
executive wine editor
Food & Wine

Back in 2013, Food & Wine executive wine editor Ray Isle sat down with New York restaurant legend and wine expert Joe Bastianich to taste “12 Great Italian Value Wines.” Lini was Ray’s pick for sparkling. Here’s what he had to say about the wine:

Lini Lambrusco Labrusca Rosso

A brisk sparkling red from one of the best traditional Lambrusco houses.

I love the way Lambrusco combines the effervescence of a sparkling wine with the body and flavor of a red wine, making it a fantastic partner for food.

SAVE THE DATE: On Saturday afternoon, July 28, our blogmaster Jeremy Parzen (aka Do Bianchi) will be hosting a Lini Lambrusco tasting at one of his favorite San Diego restaurants, Jaynes Gastropub.

Jaynes Gastropub
4677 30th St.
San Diego CA 92116
(619) 563-1011
Google map

Stay tuned for details…

Please email Jeremy to register (not required but encouraged).

Thank you! We hope to see you in San Diego in July!

Image via Corkscrew Concierge.

“In Italy’s Emilia-Romagna region, often called the ‘culinary capital of Italy,'” said Oregon-based Italian expert Bruce Bauer in an interview with Imbibe magazine late last year, “they know a thing or two about food and wine… This region is where the finest Lambrusco comes from and a place where they drink gallons of it.”

Bruce, Italian buyer for VINO in Portland, recommended the “rare” Lambrusco Bianco by Lini for the piece:

    Since 1910, the Lini family has turned out first-rate Lambrusco from their vineyards in Corregio. Bauer recommends their rare and fabulously bright Lambrusco Bianco Lambrusca Lini 910, produced without contact with the skins during fermentation. Charlie Broder also serves Lini’s Lambrusco at Terzo (in Minneapolis), noting, “Lini 910 has been making clean and pretty Lambrusco that showcase the true potential of the Lambrusco region which has quite the bastardized reputation.”

“Forget Lambrusco and discover ‘the Lambrusco,'” writes Alberto Lupetti, Italy’s leading authority on Champagne, “because this was likely the original Lambrusco.”

Lini 2005 Lambrusco Metodo Classico
92 points

If you’re expecting a classic Lambrusco, the nose of this wine will surprise you from the get-go. But in a positive way: You’ll raise an eyebrow as you experience an “ah-ha” moment. The wine is fresh and vibrant, with vivacious floral notes and a hint of citrus when you first taste it. Next come spice and medicinal herbs, roots, underbrush, and then finally the fruit appears: Small wild berries, more dry than sweet. Only as the nose begins to open up do you get the darker and more vinous notes. But the wine remains elegant and fresh all the while, with a faint hint of toast and umami aromas. You can’t help but be reminded of Pinot Noir in this wine… On the palate, the wine is fresh and silky (Fabio Lini’s decision not to allow for malolactic fermentation to take place makes for a winner: Chapeau, Fabio Lini!). The wine pivots between rhubarb and chinotto as its vinous character begins to open up and the acidity and complexity begin to emerge. The finish is clean and cleansing, with just a touch of delicate minerality and citrus…

Alberto Lupetti
May 2018

Alberto Lupetti is the editor of Grandi Champagne, now in its fourth edition, Italy’s authoritative guide to the wines of Champagne.